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Programmes & specializations videos

PhD Programme | 4 Years | FULL-TIME

For whom?

This content of this programme will be published soon. Our apologies for the inconvenience. Please contact our office if you wish to receive further information about this programme.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Pharmaco Epidemiology
  • Health Economic Analysis
  • Medical Psychology
  • Postgraduate Programme | 1 Year | FULL-TIME

    For whom?

    Consider one additional year of research training after your Master’s, if you’d like to acquire more research experience or increase your chances of qualifying for a PhD research project.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Senior Advanced PhD Programme

    For whom?

    The content of this web page is currently under construction. Our apologies for the inconvenience. Please contact our office if you wish to receive further information about this programme.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Pharmaco Epidemiology
  • Health Economic Analysis
  • Medical Psychology
  • Erasmus Summer Programme (ESP)

    For more information about the Erasmus Summer Programme (ESP), please go to:

    www.erasmussummerprogramme.nl

    Master

    Master of Science in Health Sciences | 1 Year | FULL-TIME | 70 EC points

    For whom?

    This MSc programme focuses on training students who are already educated in research methodology, but wish to take a step further in developing a successful career in health science research. This programme is also interesting if you want to enhance your chances of pursuing a PhD.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Pharmaco Epidemiology
  • Biostatistics
  • Medical Psychology
  • Research Master in Clinical Research | 2 Years | FULL-TIME | 120 EC points

    For whom?

    This Research Master programme provides a unique opportunity for ambitious students with a Bachelor degree in Medicine or Biomedical Sciences.There is a great need for clinicians who can combine patient care and research. This Research Master programme helps medical students to become clinical investigators and pursue an academic career simultaneously.

    If you are a medical student of Erasmus MC, we have accustomed the Research Master programme to your Master in Medicine.

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    Research Master in Health Sciences | 2 Years | FULL-TIME | 120 EC points

    For whom?

    Just graduated with a Bachelor Degree in clinical, public health or biomedical sciences and want to start making substantial contributions to future developments in medicine as a researcher? Then this Research Master is for you! With a wide range of specialisations and guidance from some of the greatest minds in these fields, you will be well on your way to a very successful research career.


    If you are a medical student of Erasmus MC, we have accustomed the Research Master programme to your Bachelor and Master in Medicine.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Health Economic Analysis
  • Doctorate

    PhD Programme | 4 Years | FULL-TIME

    For whom?

    This content of this programme will be published soon. Our apologies for the inconvenience. Please contact our office if you wish to receive further information about this programme.

    Read More
  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Pharmaco Epidemiology
  • Health Economic Analysis
  • Medical Psychology
  • Postgraduate Programme | 1 Year | FULL-TIME

    For whom?

    Consider one additional year of research training after your Master’s, if you’d like to acquire more research experience or increase your chances of qualifying for a PhD research project.

    Read More
  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Senior Advanced PhD Programme

    For whom?

    The content of this web page is currently under construction. Our apologies for the inconvenience. Please contact our office if you wish to receive further information about this programme.

    Read More
  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Pharmaco Epidemiology
  • Health Economic Analysis
  • Medical Psychology
  • Executive Education

    Executive Master of Science in Health Sciences | 2(+)years | Part-time | 70 EC points

    For whom?

    This Executive Master programme focuses on training individuals who have already  authored scientific publications, but wish to take a step further in developing a successful career in health science research. The programme is ideal for working professionals since you can fully customize it to fit your busy schedule.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Genetic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Pharmaco Epidemiology
  • Biostatistics
  • Medical Psychology
  • Courses

    29 Oct 2018 - 02 Nov 2018
    Public Health Research: Intervention Development and Evaluation [HS02c]

    About this course

    Public Health Research: from Epidemiology to Health Promotion

    Module: Intervention Development and Evaluation.

    This module elaborates on the intervention development, implementation and evaluation phases in the model of planned promotion of public health.

    Students will:

    • be introduced to strategies and opportunities of primary and secondary prevention;
    • learn how to work from determinants to interventions, i.e. how to translate determinants into intervention goals and intervention components and;
    • learn about the opportunities and challenges of evaluation of primary and secondary prevention interventions and;
    • be introduced to theory and challenges in dissemination of prevention interventions.

    The course uses examples from health behaviour change, cancer screening, and vaccination.

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    28 Nov 2018 - 06 Feb 2019
    Scientific Writing in English for Publication [SC07]

    About this course

    Course days in 2017-2018 will be:Wednesday November 22, Wednesday December 13, Monday January 15 and 29.The first 3 sessions will be on mornings or afternoons depending on your group.

    The last session on the 29th will be in the morning, afternoon or evening depending on your group and other course schedule.


    Writing to be read

    This course will focus on:

    • Communicating the point and importance of your research;
    • Writing a clear and readable scientific article.The course consists of 4 half-day sessions and 3 writing assignments that will receive individual feedback from the instructor as well as other course participants. Attending all 4 sessions and completing all writing assignments is compulsory.

    The course will be intensive—writing takes time—so we suggest that participants reserve considerable time for this course.

    Participants will be guided through the writing process in 3 assignments:

    1. Clarifying the point of the research;
    2. Completing the Hourglass Template with the main messages for the Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion of your research;
    3. Writing the Abstract and Title.

    Part of the work will be peer reviewing. Participants will critically discuss each of the three assignments with a peer-review partner (i.e. another course participant). The remaining members of the peer-review group will review and critique each assignment as well. This implies that participants must be willing to work closely with a peer-review partner during the course and meet deadlines for peer reviewing. After revising texts based on these reviews, participants then send them to the instructor, who will provide both substantive and language tips.

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    28 Jan 2019 - 01 Feb 2019
    Advanced Topics in Decision-making in Medicine [EWP02]

    About this course

    This course deals with intermediate- to advanced level topics in the field of medical decision making. Topics that will be addressed include building decision models, evaluation of diagnostic tests, utility assessment, multi-attribute utility theory, Markov cohort models, microsimulation state-transition models, calibration and validation of models, probabilistic sensitivity analysis, value of information analysis, and behavioral decision making. The course will focus on the practical application of techniques and will include published examples and a computer practicum. Students will learn to apply state-of-the-art modeling methods (students may choose to use  either Treeage or R (or both)) to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of health interventions. While the primary emphasis is on application, essential underlying theoretical concepts will also be discussed. During the course you will have the opportunity to work on a decision problem which you select yourself. Many students use the course as a way to start writing a paper on a decision model in the field of their interest.

    Please note: this is a challenging course. 

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    27 Aug 2018 - 14 Sept 2018
    Study Design [CC01]

    About this course

    In this course, the principles and practice of follow-up and case-control studies will be taught. The theory underlying the different design options will be discussed in depth. The course focuses on the classical approach but also addresses modern concepts. The practice of conducting follow-up and case-control studies with emphasis on issues of validity will be discussed. Lectures will be complemented by exercises using current examples of epidemiological studies.

    Participants will be asked to work out a study design and prepare a formal presentation on the last course day.

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    25 Oct 2018 - 09 Nov 2018
    Clinical Epidemiology [CE02]

    About this course

    Research questions in clinical epidemiology originate from clinical practice. Caring for patients commonly triggers the research-minded clinician to question his/her knowledge and decisions. Questions may revolve around risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and/or interventions. Results from clinical epidemiological research are used in patient management decisions. Concepts from decision sciences are used to translate clinical research results to application in day-to-day clinical practice.

    In this course, the principles and practice of clinical epidemiology and the application of the results to clinical decision making will be considered, using examples from the literature and from ongoing studies.

    We will be using blended learning: a combination of web-based materials, interactive lectures, workshops and practicums.

    The course is divided into 3 parts:

    1. Diagnosis
    2. Prognosis
    3. Interventions

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    25 Mar 2019 - 29 Mar 2019
    Planning and Evaluation of Screening [HS05]

    About this course

    This course focuses on the design and the evaluation of health care programmes for the early detection of disease or screening. Screening takes place in a population without symptoms of the disease. The screening test characteristics have consequences for the favourable (improvement of prognosis by early detection, life years saved and deaths prevented) and unfavourable (overdiagnosis, unnecessary treatments) effects of screening.


    There are a number of designs for the assessment of the effectiveness of screening, such as randomized-controlled trials, observational prospective studies and case control studies. The pros and cons of each of these designs will be discussed. Evaluation methodologies, such as cost-effectiveness, cost-utility and technology assessment will be explained, including the concepts of quality adjustment of life years and of time preference. Detailed case studies include cervical, breast and prostate cancer screening, genetic screening, youth health care and screening for tuberculosis, e.g. for high risk groups. Several computer aids for the evaluation of screening are presented.

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    22 Oct 2018 - 26 Oct 2018
    Public Health Research: Analysis of Determinants [HS02b]

    About this course

    Public Health Research: from Epidemiology to Health Promotion

    Module: Analysis of Determinants

    This module elaborates on research of the analysis of determinants of and inequalities in population health and risk factors of disease. Students will be introduced in:

    • current insights in the main determinants of population health and risk factors of disease;
    • determinants of inequalities in population health;
    • research methods for the analysis of these determinants and
    • challenges for future research in these issues.

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    21 May 2019 - 07 Jun 2019
    Introduction to Medical Writing [SC02]

    About this course

    During the second semester, full time Master of Science (70 ECTS) students will attend four workshops of three hours and one workshop of six hours on how to write correct and readable scientific articles in English. Each student will be able to bring their own work which will be commented on and corrected by participants and the teacher.

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    21 Jan 2019 - 25 Jan 2019
    Pharmaco-epidemiology and Drug Safety [EWP03]

    About this course

    Pharmaco-epidemiology plays a role of increasing importance in the field of drug safety and regulatory decision making. On the one hand, the introduction of computers into clinical practice facilitates the performance of large-scale cohort studies and nested case-control studies. On the other hand, it creates some problems regarding the quality of outcome and exposure assessment. Because the commercial consequences of pharmaco-epidemiological studies may be enormous, discussions in this area may be heated.


    In this course, referring to established drug safety problems will highlight some of the complex aspects of outcome and exposure assessment in pharmaco-epidemiology.


    Teaching Methods

    Plenary teaching as well as computer exercises on the analysis of cohort- and case-control data.

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    19 Nov 2018 - 07 Dec 2018
    Biostatistical Methods II: Classical Regression Models [EP03]

    About this course

    The aim of this course is to introduce several important statistical regression models for non-normal and censored outcomes that are widely applied in clinical and epidemiological research. The course starts with a brief presentation of the basic principles behind likelihood theory, followed by a detailed discussion of logistic regression for dichotomous data, Poisson regression for count data, and closes with an extended presentation of regression models for time-to-event data, including the Cox proportional hazards model and the accelerated failure time model.The course will be explanatory rather than mathematically rigorous, with emphasis given on application such that participants will obtain a clear view on the different modeling approaches, and how they should be used in practice.


    To this end, the course includes several computer sessions during which participants will be asked to implement in practice the methods discussed in the theory sessions. Oral exam will be on two days: December 7 and 8, 2017, and the assignment will be due three days prior to the oral exam.

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    18 Mar 2019 - 21 Mar 2019
    Psychiatric Epidemiology [EP12]

    About this course

    This four-day course focuses on the principles and practice of psychiatric epidemiology. Basic concepts and issues that are specific to both child and adult psychiatric epidemiology are covered. Psychiatric issues that will be used to illustrate concepts and practice of psychiatric epidemiology include: prevalence studies, longitudinal studies, the role of risk and resilience, and genetic epidemiology. Invited speakers will cover particular topics such as migration and psychiatirc disorder, the epidemiology of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and addiction in more detail.Maximum 40 participants.


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    18 Mar 2019 - 22 Mar 2019
    Survival Analysis for Clinicians [EWP24]

    About this course

    Survival analysis is the study of the distribution of life times, i.e. the times from an initiating event (birth, diagnosis, start of treatment) to some terminal event (relapse, death). Survival analysis is most prominently (but not only) used in the biomedical sciences. A special feature of survival data is that it takes time to observe the event of interest. A result of this seemingly innocent observation is that for a number of subjects the event is not observed, but instead it is known that it has not taken place yet. This phenomenon is called censoring and it requires special statistical methods. During the course different types of censored and truncated data will be introduced and techniques for estimating the survival function by employing both parametric and non-parametric methods will be illustrated. Also techniques for testing equality of survival functions (the log-rank test and alternatives) are discussed. Finally regression models for survival analysis, based on the hazard function (most notably the Cox proportional hazards model), will be studied in great detail. Special aspects such as time-dependent covariates and stratification will be introduced. Techniques to be used to assess the validity of the proportional hazards regression model will be discussed. The last part of the course touches on models for multivariate survival analysis, including competing risks and multi-state models and frailty models. Finally, aspects of the planning of clinical trials with lifetime data will be discussed.


    Teaching methods

    All aspects of the course will be illustrated with real data examples and will be practiced with computer practicals and/or pen-and-paper exercises.


    Survival Analysis (EWP24) is equivalent to the Survival Analysis course (ESP28) in the Erasmus Summer Programme and the part about survival analysis in  Biostatistical Methods II: classical regression models (EP03).

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    18 Feb 2019 - 22 Feb 2019
    Advanced Clinical Trials [EWP10]

    About this course

    The Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial (RCT) is the most reliable  method of assessing the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions. In order to provide the best possible evidence-based health care, health professionals must be able to judge the scientific merits and clinical relevance of published RCTs. In addition, they may be involved in designing and performing a RCT and are frequently asked to recruit patients for RCTs.

    Reports published in major medical journals show a surprising variability in methods including choice of study design, blinding, avoidance of bias, outcome measures, effect parameters, sample size calculations, data analysis techniques, presentation of results in tables and figures, and inferences made from the results. Hence, appraising trial reports can be challenging. In designing RCTs many difficult decisions need to be made with respect to these same issues.

    In this course these topics and issues will be addressed and developed through lectures and group practical sessions. A laptop during classroom sessions is required in order to do the practical assignments.


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    17 Oct 2018 - 09 Nov 2018
    Genetic-epidemiologic Research Methods [GE02]

    About this course

    The aim of this course is to introduce participants to the basic principles of genetic epidemiological research.The first part of the course is dedicated to binary traits, covering the basics of probability theory, hypothesis testing, risk calculation in families, and principles of complex segregation analysis. The second part of the course focuses on the genetics of quantitative traits, covering the concept and estimation of heritability and basic quantitative trait linkage analysis using modern genetic analysis software such as SOLAR and MERLIN. In the third part of the course design of genetic epidemiological studies will be discussed. This will be illustrated by practical examples and an assignment to develop a study.During the third week of the course, students will work in groups on this assignment, and will prepare a presentation.

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    17 Sept 2018 - 12 Oct 2018
    Biostatistical Methods I: Basic Principles [CC02]

    About this course

    The analysis of collected data is an inevitable part of almost any medical research project. Consequently, knowledge of and insight in the basic principles of data-analysis are essential for medical researchers. The course CC02 - Biostatistical Methods I: basic principles is designed to teach classical and basic statistical techniques for the analysis of medical research data. The course comprises lectures as well as computer practicals, in which students will apply the widely used statistical software package SPSS to work through exercises.


    CC02 consists of two parts. In part A, which lasts one week, basic applications of biostatistics will be introduced, including descriptive statistics, general principles of statistical hypothesis testing, statistical inferences on means and proportions, and interval estimates for association measures. In part B, which last two weeks, more advanced methods will be discussed, including linear correlation and regression, multiple linear regression, analysis of covariance, regression diagnostics, stratified analysis and time-to-event analysis. The logistic regression model and the Cox proportional hazard regression model will be introduced briefly.


    During the lectures, time will be spent on practical examples and exercises. SPSS will be introduced in the first week. Throughout the course, examples of SPSS-programmes and -output will be demonstrated in relation to the several topics that will be discussed.


    Biostatistical Methods I: Basic Principles, part A (CC02A) is equivalent to Introduction to Data-analysis (ESP03) and Biostatistics for Clinicians (EWP22).

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    15 Oct 2018 - 23 Oct 2018
    Clinical Translation of Epidemiology [CE01]

    About this course

    This course aims to bridge the gap between theoretical epidemiological concepts and application in clinical research and medicine. Understanding of basic epidemiological principles is therefore a prerequisite.

    Students will learn how abstract concepts from epidemiological theory can be translated to clinically observable phenomena. Tools and skills taught in this course will be readily applicable in clinical research on etiology, efficacy, diagnosis and prognosis. Successful completion of this course will enable students to continue with more formal training in theoretical causal inference as well as advanced courses in clinical effectiveness and clinical epidemiology.

    The course will consist of interactive lectures, working groups, group presentations and an individual assignment. Through in-class exercises the student will be provided with the opportunity to utilize the knowledge covered in the lectures on a study from the recent literature.

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    15 Oct 2018 - 16 Oct 2018
    Linux for Scientists [GE14]

    About this course

    This course aims to teach users of a Linux/UNIX system how to work with the command line interface. After an introduction to some history and basic concepts the basic commands for file and directory manipulation will be discussed. Subsequently, the students will learn how to manage processes as well as input and output redirection, followed by more advanced text processing utilities like 'sed' and 'gawk'.

    The second half of the course shows how to write Bash shell scripts to automate tasks. This knowledge is then used when discussing the Sun Grid Engine job queue system in use on the epib-genstat servers.

    The course will focus on providing hands-on experience, so those who have been using a Linux system for a longer time will be able to skip the parts they already feel comfortable with and move on to more advanced concepts like regular expressions, version control and advanced use of a text editor. 

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    15 Oct 2018 - 19 Oct 2018
    Public Health Research: Analysis of Population Health [HS02a]

    About this course

    Public Health Research: From Epidemiology to Health Promotion

    Module: Analysis of Population Health

    This module aims to teach methods to assess the health of populations at national and local levels. Students are taught to calculate, apply and interpret population-based measures of mortality, quality of life and disease occurrence. In addition, students learn methods to assess time trends in population health (e.g. APC methods) and to analyse inequalities in health between social groups.


    Note: HS02a, HS02b and HS02c will be tested after the HS02c course!

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    15 Oct 2018 - 09 Nov 2018
    Psychology in Medicine [MP01]

    About this course

    Medical psychologists study the way somatically ill people think, act and feel. The aim of this course is to teach students about psychological determinants of illness and illness behavior, the psychological consequences of somatic illness and psychological care for somatic patients. First, you’ll learn about ‘normal’ reactions to disease. We’ll then focus on abnormal and pathological reactions to somatic illness and on problems that patients might have in adjusting to their disease.


    We will discuss models that explain why some people find it difficult to adjust to their disease, such as the stress coping model and the stress vulnerability model. Other models that will be discussed in this course include the Health Belief Model, the Theory of Planned Behavior and the Stages of Change Model. These models are widely applied by medical psychologists in interventions for somatic patients. Modern neuroscientific models for understanding behaviour and behavioural disorders will be addressed as well.


    In this course, we will focus on various somatic problems, such as diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, infertility, organ transplantation and chronic pain.


    Finally, basic theories of doctor-patient communication will be discussed, as communication between doctors and patients has become more and more important.


    The learning method in this course is problem-based learning. Furthermore, you will build a new model for understanding a complex and realistic problem in medical psychology.

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    13 May 2019 - 17 May 2019
    Bayesian Statistics [CE09]

    About this course

    There is growing acknowledgement of the value of Bayesian methods for complex models in biostatistics and epidemiology, in dealing with issues such as multiplicity, measurement error, spatial associations and hierarchical structure. This course will introduce the essentials of Bayesian ideas, emphasizing practical application using exact and simulation-based software. Examples will include the use of Bayesian methods in clinical trials, institutional comparisons, smoothing of disease rates, and frailty models.

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    13 May 2019 - 17 May 2019
    Missing Values in Clinical Research [EP16]

    About this course

    Missing data frequently occur in clinical trials as well as observational studies. An important source for missing data are patients who leave the study prematurely, so-called dropouts. Alternatively, intermittent missing data might occur as well.


    When patients are evaluated only once under treatment, then the presence of dropouts makes it hard to comply with the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle. However, when repeated measurements are taken then one can make use of the observed portion of the data to retrieve information on dropouts. Generally, commonly used methods to analyse incomplete data include complete-case (CC) analysis and, in longitudinal studies, an analysis using the last observation carried forward (LOCF). However, these methods rest on strong and unverifiable assumptions about the missing mechanism. Over the last decades, a number of analysis methods have been suggested, providing a valid estimate for, e.g., the treatment effect under less restrictive assumptions.


    The assumptions regarding the dropout mechanism have been classified by Rubin and co-workers as: missing completely at random (MCAR), missing at random (MAR) and missing not at random (MNAR).


    In the first part of the course we will review various repeated measurements models and indicate under which missing data mechanism they will provide valid estimates of the treatment effect. Finally, since it is impossible to verify that the dropout mechanism is MAR we argue that, to evaluate the robustness of the conclusion, a sensitivity analysis thereby varying the assumption on the dropout mechanism should become a standard procedure when analyzing the results of a clinical trial.


    The second part of the course focuses on multiple imputation (MI), specifically the fully conditional specification (FCS, MICE), which is often considered the gold standard to handle missing data. We will discuss in detail what MI(CE) does, which assumptions need to be met in order for it to perform well, and alternative imputation approaches for settings where MICE is not optimal. The theoretic considerations will be accompanied by demonstrations and short practical sessions in R, and a workflow for doing MI using the R package mice will be proposed.

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    13 Mar 2019 - 15 Mar 2019
    Quality of Life Measurement [HS11]

    About this course

    In recent years, the patient's assessment of quality of life has developed to an important outcome measure in epidemiology and health services research. Moreover, quality of life measures are increasingly used as criteria in reimbursement policy, most notably in QALY-analysis.

    The aim of the course is to provide the participants first, with a review of the instruments currently available; Second, participants are provided with the knowledge required to select measures of quality of life that are both valid and sensitive for the research objectives of the participants;

    Third, participants will acquire the knowledge and practical skills necessary to adjust standard measures of quality of life instruments for their specific disease area’s, with a special focus on reimbursement. The programme consists of presentations, exercises and demonstrations of practical issues. Participants are invited to email their specific interest at forehand, and these topic will be discussed during the course.

    Programme:

    • Background of ‘health status' and ‘quality of life’.
    • Main principles of construction of a quality of life questionnaire.
    • Available instruments.

    Application.

    • Adaptation instruments for specific research questions: increase sensitivity.
    • QALY-analysis.
    • Practical and ethical value of measuring quality of life in a reimbursement setting.

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    12 Nov 2018 - 16 Nov 2018
    Principles in Causal Inference [EP01]

    About this course

    Epidemiologic research often entails asking and trying to answer questions toward understanding the causes and consequences of health outcomes. Answers to such causal questions require us to combine data (e.g., from observational studies) with assumptions to estimate causal effects. This course will teach students to think critically and rigorously about the implications of study design and analysis toward addressing such causal questions. Students will learn formal causal inference "languages" – including the concept of a target trial, causal diagrams, and counterfactual theory – to articulate research questions, inform an analytic approach, and identify threats to validity such as confounding.

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    12 Nov 2018 - 16 Nov 2018
    SNPs and Human Diseases [GE08]

    About this course

    The analysis of DNA polymorphisms, in particular Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), is becoming a standard research approach to understand causes of disease, in particular the so-called "complex" diseases such as diabetes, osteoporosis, cancer, etc. The aim of this course is to give a broad introduction in SNP techniques and applications. The course will deal with five main topics, which are in logical order:

    • General Introduction and Study design,
    • Bio informatic tools for SNP finding and analysis,
    • Genotyping techniques and DNA management,
    • Data analysis, and
    • Examples of research in which SNPs are used.
    Every day will cover one topic. The programme for every day will consist of four to six presentations, including international speakers, and there are learning-by-doing sessions. The possibility exists for participants to discuss their own data and work. This course is organized by the Molecular Medicine postgraduate school (MolMed) in collaboration with NIHES.For more information and application check:

    https://www.molmed.nl/

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    12 Nov 2018 - 16 Nov 2018
    The Placebo Effect [MP02]

    About this course

    The placebo effect has been studied since the 1950’s, starting with the original 1955 study of Beecher. In this course we will discuss several postulated underlying mechanisms of the placebo effect (e.g. expectancy, conditioning, affect-modulation, and doctor-patient communication). Furthermore we will debate the existence of the placebo effect and discuss the challenges in measuring the effect. Questions that will be addressed are for instance: can you deliver an open label placebo? Is it ethical to prescribe a placebo when a patient doesn’t know he is getting a sugar pill? Does the placebo effect exist outside of pain medication research? You will experience the strength of the placebo effect first hand in an experiment during the course.

    The assessment of the course will exist of the presentation of a research proposal for studying the placebo effect.

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    12 Nov 2018 - 16 Nov 2018
    International Comparison of Health Care Systems [HS03a]

    About this course

    Insight into the structure, process and outcome of health care systems is vital to be able to implement health care reforms that are effective in improving the health system performance. International comparisons of health care systems and the underlying political, organizational and financial arrangements are a multidisciplinary research field with a mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods. This course will present the various methodological approaches and will build on recent national and international experiences with comparative research.


    The course starts with a clear conceptualization and definition of a health care system, definitions of key system components such as the service delivery system (through professionals and institutions), financing, role of the government and role of patients. Health system performance will be discussed in terms of effectiveness, equity and efficiency. Analytical perspectives taken will come from public health as well as from political sciences and economics. The course will also deal with the recent work performed by international organisations such as the WHO and OECD with respect to health system performance measurement and management.

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    12 Jun 2019 - 12 Jun 2019
    Integration module [PU04]

    About this course

    Master students in Public Health will have to demonstrate their ability to integrate their knowledge and expertise into evidence-based advice for policy makers and practitioners. Based on the (draft) research paper the student will make a presentation of 10 minutes, addressing the following topics:

    • What is the problem addressed?- How does your study contribute to this problem?
    • How will your results impact population health?
    • What action should policy makers and professionals take?
    • These presentations will be followed by a discussion with faculty and fellow students. In addition, students are required to write a one page reflection on the courses in the programme.

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    11 Jun 2019 - 11 Jun 2019
    Site visit to the Municipal Health Service Rotterdam [PU03]

    About this course

    The site visit is a orientation on public health practice in the Netherlands. The visit will be to the Municipal Public Health Service of Rotterdam (GGD Rotterdam). The objective is to provide the participant with a brief insight on how the GGD is organized and which services are provided to the community. After the field visit the participant is able to describe the learning experience regarding the visit in a structured report and to compare the services provided by the GGD and the way that these services are implemented with public health services in the participant's country of origin or country of work.

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    11 Feb 2019 - 15 Feb 2019
    Preventing Failed Interventions in Behavorial Research [MP05]

    About this course

    This course elaborates on intervention development, implementation and evaluation in the field of medical psychology. The focus is on learning from encountered difficulties, mistakes en failures from previous research and researchers. Questions that will be discussed are:

    • How to design an intervention taken into account both common and specific therapy factors?
    • How to evaluate the effectiveness of your intervention and not the effectiveness of the therapist?
    • How to motivate other professionals and institutions to cooperate in a multicenter trial?
    • How to prevent loss to follow-up and dropout?
    • How to prevent various biases in your outcome measures?
    • What is the best available outcome instrument for the intervention studied?
    • How to determine which elements of your intervention are most effective?
    • How to implement your intervention?

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    09 Apr 2019 - 11 Apr 2019
    Mendelian Randomisation [GE10]

    About this course

    This 3-day course aims to give an overview of recent developments in drawing causal inferences from epidemiological data using Mendelian randomization and is aimed at individuals with a background in statistics or epidemiology with a strong statistics component. Theoretical discussion will be accompanied by introduction to available software and lab practicals.


    The first day will comprise a brief introduction to graphical models since these provide a natural framework for expressing and manipulating many of the concepts involved. We will then go on to causal modelling and the need for a formal causal framework before explicitly considering instrumental variable methods with Mendelian randomisation applications as the primary example. 

    The second day will focus on various theoretical issues, together with their relevance to practical applications in terms of what can and what cannot be done. Bayesian approaches to Mendelian randomization will also be introduced.


    On the final day, current topics of interest including checking for violations of assumptions, the use of multiple instruments and implications for case-control data will be introduced.


    N.B.: This course is organised every other year.

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    08 Apr 2019 - 12 Apr 2019
    Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases [CE05]

    About this course

    Quantitative approaches play an important role in the understanding of the spread of infectious diseases and provide important tools for prevention. During the course, the basic notions that describe the mechanisms behind the spread of a disease will be introduced. Several examples of what can be learned from the use of quantitative models will be given.


    The relation between the specific characteristics of some infectious diseases and their spread will be exemplified, e.g. for tuberculosis, hepatitis, measles, influenza, AIDS. Only a basic level of mathematics is needed, and exercises will be given to practice the theoretical concepts.

    Topics covered are:

    • Important concepts and tools in modelling the spread of infectious disease.
    • Some important quantities related to the spread of infectious diseases (incidence, prevalence, cumulative incidence, incubation time, latent time, period of infectiousness); estimation of these quantities, with an example from the HIV epidemic.
    • Simulating large scale and small scale epidemics using the computer.
    • Basic reproductive number (R0) as central determinant of whether an epidemic develops.
    • Mode of transmission (e.g. airborne, sexual) in relation to the characteristics of spread.
    • Heterogeneous spread; the role of mixing between subgroups; contact patterns.
    • Molecular epidemiology as a new tool to monitor and model the spread of an infectious disease.


    Prevention programmes.

    • Vaccination strategies in relation to characteristics of the infectious disease.
    • Cost-effectiveness analyses of prevention and treatment.
    • Screening of pooled blood samples.

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    08 Apr 2019 - 12 Apr 2019
    Cancer Epidemiology [EP13]

    About this course

    Cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. The aim of this 5-day course is to provide an overview of the contributions of exogenous and endogenous factors to the risk of various cancers. The course starts with descriptive cancer epidemiology and an overview of current concepts of cancer development at the molecular and cell level. Subsequently, genetic and non-genetic risk factors for the most important cancers will be extensively discussed, as well as gene-environment interactions. Special attention will be given to risk factors for multiple primary cancers and recent results of chemo prevention studies. Although the emphasis of the course will be on etiologic factors, one session will specifically address time trends in cancer incidence, mortality and survival rates, followed by a discussion on whether or not we are winning the battle against cancer.

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    06 May 2019 - 10 May 2019
    Biostatistical Methods I: Basic Principles Part A [CC02A]

    About this course

    The analysis of collected data is an inevitable part of almost any medical research project. Consequently, knowledge of and insight in the basic principles of data-analysis are essential for medical researchers. The course CC02 - Biostatistical Methods I: Basic Principles is designed to teach classical and basic statistical techniques for the analysis of medical research data. The course comprises lectures as well as computer practicals, in which students will apply the widely used statistical software package SPSS to work through exercises.


    In CC02 part A, which lasts one week, basic applications of biostatistics will be introduced, including descriptive statistics, general principles of statistical hypothesis testing, statistical inferences on means and proportions, and interval estimates for association measures.


    During the lectures, time will be spent on practical examples and exercises. SPSS will be introduced. Throughout the course, examples of SPSS-programs and -output will be demonstrated in relation to the several topics that will be discussed.


    The courses Introduction to Data-analysis (ESP03) and Biostatistics for Clinicians (EWP22) are equivalent to Biostatistical Methods I: basic principles, part A (CC02A).

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    05 Mar 2019 - 08 Mar 2019
    Principles of Epidemiologic Data-analysis [EWP25]

    About this course

    The course will present the basic precepts and the principles underlying the primary methods of epidemiologic data analysis. The aim of the course is for the participant to arrive at a coherent conceptualization of the core principles of epidemiologic data analysis. This is not a statistics course; although examples of analytic calculations are given and there are lab exercises assigned for homework, there is no emphasis on proficiency in the execution and calculation of results nor how to build mathematical models.The course begins with a discussion of the principles of epidemiologic data analysis, and then progresses to a discussion of precision and validity, placing a strong emphasis on a quantitative approach to analysis, using estimation, rather than a qualitative approach based on statistical significance testing. After covering the analysis of crude data, the focus shifts to the control of confounding using stratified analysis and multivariate models. Other topics that are covered include the analysis of matched data, the evaluation of interaction, the use of multivariate summary confounder scores (including propensity scores), marginal structural models, imputation of missing data, sensitivity analysis, and the estimation of trends in effect.The class presentations will be supplemented with discussion of selected published papers and computer assignments using the Episheet spreadsheet to illustrate key analytic concepts.


    Teaching Methods

    The course consists of lectures, case studies involving reading and classroom discussion, and assignments using a spreadsheet for epidemiologic data analysis, which is supplied.

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    04 Feb 2019 - 08 Feb 2019
    Family-based Genetic Analysis [GE05]

    About this course

    The course focuses on theoretical background and practical issues in the genetic analysis of complex traits. It considers two main gene-finding approaches: model-free linkage studies, and pedigree-based association analyses. It also addresses the analysis of qualitative outcomes - such as diseases - and quantitative (or continuous) traits.


    As well as maximum-likelihood estimation and Haseman-Elston methods for model-free linkage analysis, we will also cover issues such as extreme sampling, the inclusion of covariates, and the generalization of methods based on sibling pairs to other pedigree structures.


    Family-based association studies will be explored in the context of candidate genes and whole-genome association analysis. Various methods will be considered, including Transmission Disequilibrium-like tests, total tests that use between-family and withinfamily variation, and testing for maternal genotypeand parent-of-origin effects.

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    04 Feb 2019 - 08 Feb 2019
    Psychopharmacology [MP03]

    About this course

    Medical psychology is all about the interaction between mind and body: how do physical complaints affect our psychological functioning? But also: how does our psychological functioning affect us physically? When dealing with this interaction in a clinical setting, drug treatments often play an important role. Patients receiving drug treatment for psychiatric disorders frequently suffer physical side-effects, and drugs prescribed for somatic disorders can influence our mental state.


    Therefore, medical psychologists need to know which drugs are prescribed for common psychiatric and somatic disorders, and need to have a basic understanding of how these (psychoactive) drugs work, how and why they invariably lead to side-effects, and how these side-effect affect compliance. We will look at drug treatment for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, but also at drugs like corticosteroids – used in the treatment of somatic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease – which have been found to increase the risk of suicidal behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders (i.e. depression, panic and manic episodes).

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    01 Apr 2019 - 05 Apr 2019
    Repeated Measurements [CE08]

    About this course

    This course covers statistical methods to be used when one or more variables are repeatedly measured in time on the same experimental unit. For instance, in a clinical trial, the outcome variable can be measured at baseline and at different times during the treatment period. In a meta-analysis, the study can be regarded as the experimental unit and the observations of patients within the same study as repeated measurements.


    In the last 10 or 15 years much progress has been made in the development of new methods of analysis. In recent years several of these new methods have been implemented in a wide variety of computer packages.


    The course starts with a short overview of simple methods for analyzing repeated measurements data, followed by a short recap of the most basic concepts of linear algebra needed for the presentation of the most advanced models.


    Then the main focus turns on more advanced methods. For approximately normally distributed repeated measurements outcomes marginal and linear mixed models are introduced. For non-normal responses, first the generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach for marginal inferences is presented, followed by extensions of random effects models to categorical outcomes. All these methods are exemplified using data from of clinical and epidemiological studies.


    Computer practicals in the statistical programming language R will be used to acquire hands on experience in applying these techniques to real data. All code used during the course will be live demonstrated using a web app, which will be made avaliable to participants.


    Participants need to bring their own laptop with certain pre-installed software (instructions will be given before start of the course). The assignment for this course needs to be handed in two weeks after the ending of the course on Friday April 27 2018.

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