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Programmes & specializations videos

Postgraduate Programme | 1 Year | FULL-TIME

For whom?

Consider one additional year of research training after your Master’s, if you’d like to acquire more research experience or increase your chances of qualifying for a PhD research project.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Genomic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Erasmus Summer Programme (ESP)

    For more information about the Erasmus Summer Programme (ESP), please go to:

    www.erasmussummerprogramme.nl

    Master

    Master of Science in Health Sciences | 1 Year | FULL-TIME | 70 EC points

    For whom?

    This MSc programme focuses on training students who are already educated in research methodology, but wish to take a step further in developing a successful career in health science research. This programme is also interesting if you want to enhance your chances of pursuing a PhD.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Medical Psychology
  • Biostatistics
  • Health Decision Sciences
  • Genomic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Research Master in Clinical Research | 2 Years | FULL-TIME | 120 EC points

    For whom?

    This Research Master programme provides a unique opportunity for ambitious students with a Bachelor degree in Medicine or Biomedical Sciences.There is a great need for clinicians who can combine patient care and research. This Research Master programme helps medical students to become clinical investigators and pursue an academic career simultaneously.

    If you are a medical student of Erasmus MC, we have accustomed the Research Master programme to your Master in Medicine.

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    Research Master in Health Sciences | 2 Years | FULL-TIME | 120 EC points

    For whom?

    Just graduated with a Bachelor Degree in clinical, public health or biomedical sciences and want to start making substantial contributions to future developments in medicine as a researcher? Then this Research Master is for you! With a wide range of specialisations and guidance from some of the greatest minds in these fields, you will be well on your way to a very successful research career.


    If you are a medical student of Erasmus MC, we have accustomed the Research Master programme to your Bachelor and Master in Medicine.

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  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Health Economic Analysis
  • Medical Psychology
  • Biostatistics
  • Health Decision Sciences
  • Genomic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Study Towards a PhD

    Postgraduate Programme | 1 Year | FULL-TIME

    For whom?

    Consider one additional year of research training after your Master’s, if you’d like to acquire more research experience or increase your chances of qualifying for a PhD research project.

    Read More
  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Genomic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Executive education

    Executive Master of Science in Health Sciences | 2(+)years | Part-time | 70 EC points

    For whom?

    This world-class programme is ideal for the working health professional, who wishes to take a step further in developing a successful career in health science research. The programme can be fully customized to fulfill your professional and personal aspirations and fit your busy schedule.

    Read More
  • Epidemiology
  • Clinical Epidemiology
  • Public Health Epidemiology
  • Medical Psychology
  • Biostatistics
  • Health Decision Sciences
  • Genomic & Molecular Epidemiology
  • Courses

    01 Jul 2021 - 17 Sept 2021
    Review of Mathematics and Introduction to Statistics [CK001]

    About this course

    Several courses in the NIHES curriculum require a good working knowledge of basic concepts in mathematics and statistics. These courses include Biostatistics I (CK020), Biostatistics II (CK030), Repeated Measurements (CE08) and Bayesian Statistics (CE09). The course Review of Mathematics and Introduction to Statistics aims to prepare you for these statistical courses by helping you to obtain a sufficient working knowledge of mathematics and statistics. This course is a self-study course based on online material (videos from external sources) and the material in an accompanying reader. There will be no lectures or tutorials, but the organizers of the course are available for questions during the course. A number of exercises and a practice test are included in the course materials. The content of this course is divided into the following topics:

    • Basic mathematical operations
    • Functions
    • Differentiation
    • Optimization
    • Integration
    • Vectors and matrices
    • Basic concepts in statistics

    This course was previously registered under the course code BST01.

    Read More

    01 Nov 2021 - 12 Nov 2021
    Clinical Epidemiology [CK040]

    About this course

    Research questions in clinical epidemiology originate from clinical practice. Caring for patients commonly triggers the research-minded clinician to question his/her knowledge and decisions. Questions may revolve around risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, prognosis and/or interventions leading to research studies. Results from clinical epidemiological research are used in patient management decisions. Understanding the research results, recognizing the limitations, and knowing how to apply them are essential to translate clinical research results to application in day-to-day clinical practice.

    In this course, the principles and practice of clinical epidemiology and the application of the results to clinical decision making will be discussed, using examples from the literature and from ongoing studies. The course is divided into 3 parts:

    1. Diagnosis
    2. Prognosis
    3. Interventions

    We use blended learning: a combination of video’s, readings, assignments, question-and-answer sessions, interactive lectures, and workshops.

    The assignments involve performing calculations. For the Diagnosis part we work with Excel. For the Prognosis part you will be using R code that has been written for you. To benefit maximally from this course we advise you to do the introduction to R - online course: install R and R Studio, learn basic R syntax, and learn basic R studio functionality. The DataCamp course Introduction to R is very helpful: https://www.datacamp.com/courses/free-introduction-to-r. The full DataCamp course will be available for course participants.

    For students in our master programmes, the core concepts presented in this course will be assessed in the core competences exam that bundles the fall semester courses. This is in addition to the assessment during the course in the form of assignment(s). The core competences exam is only mandatory for students starting their programme in August 2021 or later, while the assignments during the course are mandatory for all participating students.

    Read More

    03 May 2021 - 11 May 2021
    Presentation Skills for All Audiences [SC15]

    About this course

    In this ‘hands-on’ course you will learn how to present your research in a concise, structured and inspiring way. In addition to general presentation skills you will learn how to deliver your message to any audience (lay as well as scientific audiences), special attention will be given to online presentations, pitching your work and answering audience questions.

    Read More

    03 May 2021 - 14 May 2021
    Operations Management [SC16]

    About this course

    Operations management is concerned with evaluating the performance of operating units, understanding why they perform as they do, designing new or improved operating procedures and systems for competitive advantage, making short-run and long-run decisions that affect operations, and managing the work force. To understand the role of operations in any organization, a manager must understand process analysis, capacity analysis, types of processes, productivity analysis, development and use of quality standards, and the role of operating strategy in corporate strategy. The course will also present the focused management approach which can help an organization achieve much more with existing resources. The course will demonstrate how operations management—in particular Lean and the Theory of Constraints (TOC)—can rapidly advance value and performance in any health care organization. Utilizing a systems approach that will be relevant for health care managers and executives, it unpacks and demystifies concepts such as performance measures, operations, quality, cost accounting, pricing, and value enhancement, all as they relate to eliminating waste and non-value-adding activities.

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    03 Jun 2021 - 10 Jun 2021
    Intercultural Communication [SC13]

    About this course

    The course Intercultural Communication consists of two workshops (3 hours each). The first workshop is aimed at increasing students’ self-awareness and reflexivity regarding their own cultural background and their individual intercultural competences. The second workshop will provide hands-on training to increase these competences, using interactive games, roleplaying, and/or practical exercises. The course and training materials will be based on recent scientific insights in intercultural competence and intercultural training effectiveness.

    Read More

    05 May 2021 - 09 Jun 2021
    Scientific Integrity [SC10]

    About this course

    These days doing research is a career. With this career comes an environment with incentives, pressures and temptations that may undermine the scientific quality of the work. How do you keep doing what is right when that may harm your career (at the very least at short notice)? We look at the history of science as a career choice. We will discuss what science is, and we will discuss some of the reasons researchers experience pressure to do less well than they intended. We will do this with the help of the movie 'On being a scientist'.

    Read More

    07 Jun 2021 - 07 Jun 2021
    Site visit to the Municipal Health Service Rotterdam [PU03]

    About this course

    The site visit is a orientation on public health practice in the Netherlands. The visit will be to the Municipal Public Health Service of Rotterdam (GGD Rotterdam). The objective is to provide the participant with a brief insight on how the GGD is organized and which services are provided to the community. After the field visit the participant is able to describe the learning experience regarding the visit in a structured report and to compare the services provided by the GGD and the way that these services are implemented with public health services in the participant's country of origin or country of work.

    Read More

    09 Jun 2021 - 09 Jun 2021
    Integration module [PU04]

    About this course

    Master students in Public Health will have to demonstrate their ability to integrate their knowledge and expertise into evidence-based advice for policy makers and practitioners. Based on the (draft) research paper the student will make a presentation of 10 minutes, addressing the following topics:

    • What is the problem addressed?- How does your study contribute to this problem?
    • How will your results impact population health?
    • What action should policy makers and professionals take?
    • These presentations will be followed by a discussion with faculty and fellow students. In addition, students are required to write a one page reflection on the courses in the programme.

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    09 Aug 2021 - 13 Aug 2021
    Principles of Research in Medicine and Epidemiology [ESP01]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Arfan Ikram, MD PhD


    This course will provide an orientation to medical research from a quantitative and epidemiological viewpoint. The course will give an introduction to the design of clinical and public health research, and it will discuss measures of disease frequency and association, and the validity of research in medicine. It will give an overview of elements of data-analysis.

    Teaching methods:
    Interactive lectures, exercises, practicals


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    09 Aug 2021 - 13 Aug 2021
    Introduction to Data-analysis [ESP03]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Adelin Albert, PhD

    This course is a general introduction to the basics of statistics used in biomedical and public health applications. We start with a general definition of statistics and give some examples. We then review the notions of population, sample, variables (qualitative and quantitative) and data (missing, outlying, and censored). Next, the course focusses on ways to describe data such as tables, graphs, distributions and summary statistics (mean, standard deviation, median, quartiles) as reported in medical journals. Lifetime data will be visualized graphically by the celebrated Kaplan-Meier survival curve. Association measures between variables (correlation, regression, relative risk, odds ratio and hazard ratio) as well as agreement measures between observers (Cohen kappa coefficient) will be discussed.

    The course will then turn on the relation between the population and the random sample and on how characteristics observed in the sample can be generalized to the population. Some elementary probability elements will be needed here. This will lead to the important concepts of standard error and confidence intervals (for means, proportions, odds ratios, hazard ratios). The general theory of hypothesis testing will be briefly outlined from an intuitive perspective and the fundamental concepts of statistical significance, power calculation and p-value will be introduced. Then, we shall review some of the most frequently used testing procedures: correlation test, unpaired and paired t-tests for comparing two means values, analysis of variance for comparing several means (with multiple tests correction), chi-squared test (Fisher exact test) for comparing two proportions and more generally for contingency tables, McNemar test for paired proportions, and two-way analysis of variance for repeated data. The logistic model and Cox model will be briefly alluded to because of their importance in the medical literature. Finally, the basic principles underlying non parametric tests will be outlined and some of the most used distribution-free tests presented (Spearman correlation, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman tests).

    During the course, a brief introduction to the R statistical software will be given to participants. R is free of charge, increasingly used worldwide, but not easy to learn for the layman due to its tedious programming language. There is however a 'Point-and-Click' interface for R called the 'R Commander' or simply 'Rcmdr' which is really easy to learn and use. Thus, students will acquire some familiarity with the R Commander, do basic statistical calculations and draw nice graphs even on large datasets.

    Topics covered in the course will be illustrated using real data from the medical literature. Participants will also use Rcmdr during the course.

    This course is equivalent to Biostatistics for Clin


    //Pleasenote that the course information is subject to change and will be updated fromtime to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//


    Read More

    09 Aug 2021 - 13 Aug 2021
    Introduction to Global Public Health [ESP41]

    About this course

    Faculty: Rajiv Chowdhury, MD PhD


    The key aim of this course is to learn about the principal issues surrounding global health and the main outcome of the course will be a better understanding of how epidemiology and public health can more effectively protect the health of disadvantaged populations in the changing global context.


    Some of the specific health issues to be discussed include: the global rise of the non-communicable diseases (NCD) such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes; threats to health from pre-existing and emerging communicable diseases; maternal and child health issues, and the impact of global environmental change. Additionally, other related issues such as concepts and realities of health systems around the world, impact of globalization on health, and how to measure global health will be discussed. For each health problem, where appropriate, there will be a discussion of: burden of disease, major determinants, intervention policies and programmes, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the interventions. A key focus of the course would be small group interactions.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    09 Aug 2021 - 13 Aug 2021
    Principles of Genetic Epidemiology [ESP43]

    About this course

    Faculty: Abbas Dehghan MD, PhD (Associate professor, Imperial College London) and Mohsen Ghanbari MD, PhD (Assistant professor, Erasmus MC)

    This course aims to give a basic introduction to various methods used in classical genetic epidemiology. In combination with the two courses Genomics in Molecular Medicine and Genome-Wide Association Studies present in the Erasmus Summer Programme, the course offers an excellent introduction to genetic epidemiologic research. The course targets a wide range of participants, including students, epidemiologists, clinicians and molecular biologists with no background in genetic epidemiology. Participants are introduced to the basic principles of population genetics, segregation, linkage and association analyses. The relevant background of human genetics and statistics is presented. The goal of the course is that participants are able to interpret the findings in modern genetic research.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    09 Aug 2021 - 13 Aug 2021
    Logistic Regression [ESP66]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Stanley Lemeshow, PhD


    This course provides theoretical and practical training for biostatisticians, epidemiologists and professionals of related disciplines in statistical modeling with particular emphasis on logistic regression. The increasingly popular logistic regression model has become the standard method for regression analysis of binary, multinomial and ordinal response data in the health sciences.

    Timeline:

    10.00 - 12.00 hrs Practicum (option to choose morning or evening Practicum)

    13.00 - 17.00 hrs Classes

    17.00 - 19.00 hrs Practicum (option to choose morning or evening Practicum)


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    09 Aug 2021 - 13 Aug 2021
    Advances in Clinical Epidemiology [ESP77]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Albert Hofman, MD PhD

    This course will discuss recent developments in epidemiologic methods for clinical research. It will review the various study designs and major issues in the validity of clinical epidemiologic studies. Advances in the design of clinical trials will be discussed. The application of novel causal inference methods and the use of instrumental variables will be addressed.

    The course includes both didactic interactive lectures as well as discussions and workshops. The workshops will provide the opportunity to discuss, in greater depth, the principles covered in the lectures.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    10 Jun 2021 - 01 Jul 2021
    Science Communication [SC18]

    About this course

    As a researcher, you will be trained to communicate your research findings to colleagues by means of a poster, a conference talk, or a scientific publication. But fellow scientists are not the only target group for our results, we often want to further disseminate our findings. Are we well equipped to communicate our research findings to a wider audience and what does it take to do this properly?

    In four half-day sessions we will explore some of the basic principles of science communication. In the lectures we will discuss topics such as what is meant by societal impact, how to determine the target group of your research and how to communicate to different audiences. In subsequent interactive sessions, you will implement the gained knowledge in several exercises using your own research.

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    11 Oct 2021 - 29 Oct 2021
    Biostatistics II [CK030]

    About this course

    This course presents statistical regressions models for the analysis of dichotomous, count, and time-to-event data. In the first part, the course builds upon the introductory presentation of logistic regression from the Biostatistics I course and shows some of its extensions, including the conditional logistic regression model. The course then introduces regression models for the analysis of count data. The last part focuses on the statistical analysis of time-to-event data, starting from simple statistical tests and followed by the presentation of accelerated failure time and Cox proportional hazards models. For each modeling framework, a detailed discussion is given on how to build the model to answer the scientific questions of interest, estimate the model’s parameters, assess its assumptions, and finally, interpret the results of the analysis.

    The course will be explanatory rather than mathematically rigorous, emphasizing application such that participants will obtain a clear view of the different modeling approaches and how they should be used in practice. To this end, the course includes several computer sessions, during which participants will learn to work with the R statistical language and implement the methods discussed in the theory sessions.

    For students in our master programmes, the core concepts presented in this course will be assessed in the core competences exam that bundles the fall semester courses. This is in addition to the assessment during the course in the form of assignment(s). The core competences exam is only mandatory for students starting their programme in August 2021 or later, while the assignments during the course are mandatory for all participating students.

    Read More

    15 Nov 2021 - 26 Nov 2021
    Principles of Public Health [CK050]

    About this course

    Life expectancy increased in the past decades, but will this remain to be the case? While public health strategies contributed to improvements in population health, major challenges remain. Improving population health in the next decade(s) requires a thorough analysis of current challenges, their causes and solutions. In this course, students will learn the concepts and methods for an analysis of the health of the population, the identification of the main causes, and the evaluation of strategies to improve population health. Summary measures of population health and the impact of diseases on population health will be start of the course, followed by a life course perspective on multilevel determinants of health. Variations in health will be investigated with mediation analysis. Students will also be introduced in mixed method approaches for the evaluation of public health strategies, including natural experiments.

    For students in our master programmes, the core concepts presented in this course will be assessed in the core competences exam that bundles the fall semester courses. This is in addition to the assessment during the course in the form of assignment(s). The core competences exam is only mandatory for students starting their programme in August 2021 or later, while the assignments during the course are mandatory for all participating students.

    Read More

    16 Aug 2021 - 20 Aug 2021
    Regression Analysis [ESP09]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Brian Marx, PhD


    This intermediate level course aims at providing theoretical and practical training for epidemiologists, clinicians and other professionals of related health disciplines in statistical modeling with particular emphasis on straight line linear and multiple regression. Included topics are: review of straight line regression and correlation, ANOVA for straight line regression, appropriateness of straight line model, polynomial regression, multiple regression analysis, partial F-test, dummy/indicator variables, statistical interaction, comparing straight line regressions, analysis of covariance, estimation and interpretation, goodness-of-fit, model selection, collinearity and outlier diagnostics. Additionally, extensions to some generalized linear models, such as logistic (binomial) regression and Poisson regression, will be introduced and interpreted through examples-- thus helping to bridge the material presented in ESP66 (Logistic Regression).


    This course is equivalent to Regression Analysis for Clinicians (EWP23).


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    16 Aug 2021 - 20 Aug 2021
    Methods of Public Health Research [ESP11]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Lex Burdorf, Ir. PhD


    This course provides an introduction to essential study designs and analytic methods available to public health researchers to describe the influence of important determinants on public health and to evaluate effects of primary preventive intervention on public health. This course focuses on population health rather than individual health and explains why different designs and methods are required, such as ecological studies and multilevel analysis. The course targets three key issues: (1) summary measures of population health, such as life expectancy, (2) measures of association and relative importance of specific causes for population health, such as population attributable fraction, and (3) evaluation of population interventions through community trials and study designs based on natural experiments instead of RCT. Designs and methods will be illustrated in lectures and exercises and application will demonstrate their usefulness in current hot topics, such as health inequalities; causes and consequences of ageing; avoidable diseases such as cancer; and evaluation of complex societal interventions.

    The course will be relevant to those who have a basic knowledge of epidemiology, and who wish to start a career in public health research.

    Teaching methods:
    This course will use lectures, exercises, and group discussion as teaching tools.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    16 Aug 2021 - 20 Aug 2021
    History of Epidemiologic Ideas [ESP53]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Alfredo Morabia, MD PhD


    This is a methodology course, which focuses on the historical evolution of methods (e.g., study designs) and concepts (e.g., confounding, bias, interaction and causal inference) that constitute today’s epidemiology. For each topic, we review and discuss the historical contexts and some landmark studies that led to specific innovations in terms of performance of group comparisons, population thinking and framing of hypotheses. We finally discuss the historical conditions for the emergence of epidemiology as a scientific discipline, the phases it went through and its potential, future developments.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    16 Aug 2021 - 20 Aug 2021
    Introduction to Bayesian Methods in Clinical Research [ESP68]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Emmanuel Lesaffre, PhD


    This course provides an introduction to Bayesian methods with an emphasis on the intuitive ideas and applications. The course treats the basic concepts of the Bayesian approach, such as the prior and posterior distribution and their summary measures (mean, median, credible interval, etc), the posterior predictive distribution. In addition, Bayesian methods for model selection and model evaluation will be treated.


    The Bayesian approach will also be compared, both conceptually as well as practically, with the classical frequentist approach. Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques are introduced and exemplified in a variety of applications. The Bayesian approach will be illustrated in clinical trials, epidemiological studies, meta-analyses, diagnostic testing, agreement studies, etc. WinBUGS and OpenBUGS will be used as software. But also the use of their interfaces with R, i.e. R2WinBUGS and R2OpenBUGS will be illustrated.


    Course format:

    In the first three days of the course the Bayesian concepts will be explained. Theory and exercises will then be mixed depending on the topic. The final two days will be devoted to particular application areas and have largely a practical flavor. In addition the application of the Bayesian methodology in the medical literature will be highlighted.


    Teaching methods:

    Interactive lectures, exercises, practicals


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    16 Aug 2021 - 20 Aug 2021
    Fundamentals of Medical Decision Making [ESP70]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. John Wong, MD


    This course will provide an introduction to health care decision making. Given the uncertainty, trade-offs and values that are involved, how should patients, policymakers and clinicians navigate through a complex and tangled web of diagnostic and therapeutic choices, patient preferences, and resource constraints to make optimal decisions? Medical interventions may have benefits but also adverse effects, e.g., surgery may lead to undesirable complications, and diagnostic technologies may produce false or inconclusive results.


    In many clinical and health policy decisions it is necessary to counterbalance benefits and harms and to trade off competing objectives such as maximizing life expectancy vs. optimizing quality of life vs. minimizing the resources required. In this course we will discuss a proactive approach to such decisions and discuss the basic concepts underlying decision analysis in order to integrate evidence and values for optimal and efficient care choices in the face of uncertainty. Topics include diagnostic reasoning, test interpretation, treatment thresholds, test-treat thresholds, estimating life expectancy, quality of life assessment, health technology, decision models and cost-effectiveness analysis.


    Teaching methods: Interactive lectures, exercises and practicums.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

    Read More

    16 Aug 2021 - 20 Aug 2021
    Causal Inference [ESP48]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Miguel Hernán, MD & Dr. Sonja Swanson


    The goal of many epidemiologic studies is to quantify the causal effect of a treatment (or exposure) on an outcome. In contrast, commonly used statistical methods provide measures of association that may lack a causal interpretation even when the investigator adjusts for all potential confounders in the analysis of a properly designed study.


    To eliminate the discordance between the causal goals and the associational methods in epidemiology, it is necessary to a) formally define causal concepts such as causal effect and confounding, b) identify the conditions required to estimate causal effects, and c) use analytical methods that, under those conditions, provide estimates that can be endowed with a causal interpretation. These so-called g-methods can be used under less restrictive conditions than traditional statistical methods. For example, g-methods allow one to estimate the causal effect of a time-varying treatment in the presence of time-varying confounders that are affected by the treatment.


    This course combines counterfactual theory and graph theory to present an integrated framework for causal inference from observational data, with a special emphasis on complex longitudinal data. The course presents the latest methodologic developments for the design and analysis of longitudinal studies. Specifically, the course will introduce the three g-methods (inverse probability weighting of marginal structural models; parametric g-formula; and g-estimation of structural nested models) in the setting of time-fixed treatments, and demonstrate inverse probability weighting for addressing causal questions regarding static and dynamic treatment strategies.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    17 May 2021 - 21 May 2021
    Using R for Decision Modeling in Health Technology Assessment [CE16]

    About this course

    This course aims to teach how to build decision models in R to students who have a basic understanding of health decision science.

    • The course combines lectures with R coding exercise.
    • The course is project-based. You are encouraged to apply the theory and skills you learn during this course to a decision problem you select yourself.

    More detailed information about each session will be provided in the syllabus.

    Attendance of all lectures and practicums is highly recommended in order to be able to complete the assignments and case example successfully. Each day builds on knowledge and skills from the previous day. Clarification of the material taught is best done in the interactive teaching environment provided during classroom sessions.


    Due to popular demand and limited places, a second edition of this course is planned for May 2021.

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    17 May 2021 - 21 May 2021
    Missing Values in Clinical Research [EP16]

    About this course

    Missing data frequently occur in clinical trials as well as observational studies. An important source for missing data are patients who leave the study prematurely, so-called dropouts. Alternatively, intermittent missing data might occur as well.


    When patients are evaluated only once under treatment, then the presence of dropouts makes it hard to comply with the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle. However, when repeated measurements are taken then one can make use of the observed portion of the data to retrieve information on dropouts. Generally, commonly used methods to analyse incomplete data include complete-case (CC) analysis and, in longitudinal studies, an analysis using the last observation carried forward (LOCF). However, these methods rest on strong and unverifiable assumptions about the missing mechanism. Over the last decades, a number of analysis methods have been suggested, providing a valid estimate for, e.g., the treatment effect under less restrictive assumptions.


    The assumptions regarding the dropout mechanism have been classified by Rubin and co-workers as: missing completely at random (MCAR), missing at random (MAR) and missing not at random (MNAR).


    In the first part of the course we will review various repeated measurements models and indicate under which missing data mechanism they will provide valid estimates of the treatment effect. Finally, since it is impossible to verify that the dropout mechanism is MAR we argue that, to evaluate the robustness of the conclusion, a sensitivity analysis thereby varying the assumption on the dropout mechanism should become a standard procedure when analyzing the results of a clinical trial.


    The second part of the course focuses on multiple imputation (MI), specifically the fully conditional specification (FCS, MICE), which is often considered the gold standard to handle missing data. We will discuss in detail what MI(CE) does, which assumptions need to be met in order for it to perform well, and alternative imputation approaches for settings where MICE is not optimal. The theoretic considerations will be accompanied by demonstrations and short practical sessions in R, and a workflow for doing MI using the R package mice will be proposed.


    Examination for this course consists of two assignments.

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    19 Apr 2021 - 23 Apr 2021
    Advanced Decision Modeling [CE15]

    About this course

    This week-long, project-based course aims to provide students with an understanding of advanced methods used in decision-analytic modeling and cost-effectiveness analyses. These include topics like the latest methods for calibration and validation, quantifying uncertainty, and consideration of heterogeneity of patient benefits and equity issues. The course combines lectures and readings to give theoretical foundation and perspectives with in depth project work and presentations to give practical concrete understanding in a way that furthers students’ specific research goals.

    Course Structure (note: the online version of the course may differ somewhat):
    Each day will begin with a lecture by Professor Goldhaber-Fiebert on an advanced methods topic. After the lecture, lab sessions will commence with students working on their projects as Professor Goldhaber-Fiebert circulates through the room and students assist each other in a collaborative environment. Most days Professor Goldhaber-Fiebert will also give an afternoon lecture. In addition, at the end of days 2, 3, and 4, Professor Goldhaber-Fiebert will give an additional, shorter, informal lecture (i.e., "a chalk talk") on a methods topic tailored to specific issues that are arising within students’ projects. Additionally, throughout the week, Professor Goldhaber-Fiebert will have one-on-one meetings with students about their projects.

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    20 Sept 2021 - 08 Oct 2021
    Biostatistics I [CK020]

    About this course

    This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of statistical data analysis. The course starts with a presentation of fundamental notions of statistics and statistical inference under uncertainty. The course then continues with an in-depth presentation of classical regression models, namely, linear regression for continuous data, logistic regression for dichotomous data. Classical statistical parameter and non-parametric statistical tests are linked to these models. For each modeling framework, a detailed discussion is given on how to build the model to answer the scientific questions of interest, estimate the model’s parameters, assess its assumptions, and finally, interpret the results of the analysis.

    The course will be explanatory rather than mathematically rigorous, emphasizing application such that participants will obtain a clear view of the different modeling approaches and how they should be used in practice. To this end, the course includes several computer sessions, during which participants will learn to work with the R statistical language and implement the methods discussed in the theory sessions.

    For students in our master programmes, the core concepts presented in this course will be assessed in the core competences exam that bundles the fall semester courses. This is in addition to the assessment during the course in the form of assignment(s). The core competences exam is only mandatory for students starting their programme in August 2021 or later, while the assignments during the course are mandatory for all participating students.

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    21 Jun 2021 - 25 Jun 2021
    Qualitative Research Methods in Medicine [MP06]

    About this course

    Qualitative research is becoming more prominent in medicine and health care. In this 5-day course, students will be introduced to the basic principles of qualitative research methods in medicine. Students will be equipped with the necessary knowledge and skills to design, conduct and report on qualitative research. In addition, the basic principles of data-analysis using the qualitative data analysis program NVivo will be taught.

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Social Epidemiology [ESP61]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Frank van Lenthe, PhD


    This course aims to introduce and illustrate modern research methods in social epidemiology, i.e. the study of the social determinants and social outcomes of health. The three main areas to be covered are: the measurement of health inequalities, the explanation of health inequalities, and the evaluation of interventions and policies to reduce health inequalities. Application of the research methods will be illustrated with historical landmark studies as well as recent examples from the international literature.


    The programme consists of lectures, hands-on exercises, and group discussions. The focus will be on socioeconomic inequalities in health, but the role of other social factors (such as ethnicity and marital status) will also be discussed.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Practice of Epidemiologic Analysis [ESP65]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Kamran Ikram, MD PhD


    This is a course in which the theoretical background and practical application of basic epidemiologic analytic tools is discussed. Special attention will be paid on issues such as normalization, standardization, and categorization, combining multiple variables, combining multiple sources etc. The goal is to provide students with the understanding and tools to perform epidemiologic data analysis.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Causal Mediation Analysis [ESP69]

    About this course

    Faculty: Linda Valeri, PhD


    The course will cover some of the recent developments in causal mediation analysis and provide practical tools to implement these techniques. Mediation analysis concerns assessing the mechanisms and pathways by which causal effects operate. The course will cover the relationship between traditional methods for mediation in epidemiology and the social sciences and new methods in causal inference. For dichotomous, continuous, and time-to-event outcomes, discussion will be given as to when the standard approaches to mediation analysis are valid. Using ideas from causal inference and natural direct and indirect effects, alternative mediation analysis techniques will be described when the standard approaches will not work. The no-confounding assumptions needed for these techniques will be described.


    SAS, SPSS and Stata macros to implement these techniques will be covered and distributed to course participants. The use and implementation of sensitivity analysis techniques to assess the how sensitive conclusions are to violations of assumptions will be covered. Discussion will be given to how such mediation analysis approaches can be extended to settings in which data come from a case-control study design. The methods will be illustrated by various applications.


    The course will employ a combination of lecture, discussion, and software demonstration. Powerpoint slides will be used to present material in lecture form. Extensive printed notes will be available for students. A wide variety of examples from epidemiology and the social sciences will be used to illustrate the techniques and approaches. Ample time will be given for discussion and questions. A variety of software packages will be discussed. Students will have worked exercises that they can complete on their own.


    Timeline:

    14.30 - 16.30 hrs Live Lectures (attendance mandatory)

    17.00 - 20.00 hrs Live Lectures (will be recorded*)

    *will be published on Canvas after 20.00 hrs, and need to be viewed before the next Live Lecture.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Joint Models for Longitudinal and Survival Data [ESP72]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Dimitris Rizopoulos, PhD


    Longitudinal and time-to-event outcomes are the main types of outcomes encountered in medical studies. Primary examples of the former are biomarkers or other patient parameters that are measured during follow-up, whereas for the latter examples include the time to relapse of the disease, time to re-operation or time to death. This course introduces a new type of statistical models that can be used to investigate the association structure between longitudinal and survival outcomes.


    In terms of software, we will use R and illustrate how these models can be fitted using package JM and JMbayes.

    Participants will be expected to bring their own laptop computers to the session, and to have recent versions of R

    (http://www.r-project.org/) and of R packages JM

    (http://cran.r-project.org/package=JM) and JMbayes

    (http://cran.r-project.org/package=JMbayes) already installed on these computers. All necessary computer code will be provided beforehand.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Genome-wide association studies [ESP74]

    About this course

    Faculty: Prof. Fernando Rivadeneira, MD PhD


    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) constitute a powerful approach to investigate the genetic basis of multifactorial disorders. In the last decade, GWAS have yielded spectacular successes in the discovery of genes involved in complex traits and disorders (e.g. body height, BMI, cardiovascular disease, cancer and neurological disorders). This was made possible by the advent of high-throughput genotyping technology and the knowledge on genome structure and organization derived from the HapMap and 1000 Genomes Projects. Applying the GWAS approach has facilitated researchers to incorporate these analyses into large genetic, clinical and epidemiological studies.


    This course aims to introduce epidemiologists, molecular biologists and clinicians into the basic principles of GWAS, addressing aspects of study design, data collection and analysis, extending to the interpretation and follow-up of results. The course consists of lectures providing a conceptual framework on crucial aspects of quality control, imputation of missing genotypes, statistical tools, methods to detect and correct for stratification, meta-analysis and genomic annotation of GWAS signals; accompanied by instructive hands-on computer exercises on the principles of analysis of quantitative traits and disease outcomes using software packages that are available in the public domain.


    The course format will allow interactive break-out discussion sessions on theoretical and practical aspects of running GWAS, together with expert-advice procurement on diverse components of collaborative research within networks and consortia.


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Gender and Health [ESP78]

    About this course

    Faculty: Dr. Maryam Kavousi MD PhD, Dr. Jeanine Roeters van Lennep MD PhD

    Invited speakers


    To realize gender equality in health care, sex and gender dimension needs to be integrated in all aspects of research and clinical practice. This course brings together experts from a multitude of disciplines including clinical, basic science, public health and policy and provides participants with resources that will assist them in developing and strengthening gender-equal clinical care and research programs. The course will focus on the critical health issues for women and men through the life cycle, challenges of integrating sex and gender from the health research, practice, and policy perspectives, as well as strategies to address these challenges.


    This course is formerly known as Women’s Health (NIHES EP19).


    Teaching methods: Interactive lectures


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    23 Aug 2021 - 27 Aug 2021
    Data Science in Epidemiology [ESP80]

    About this course

    Faculty: Dr. Gennady Roshchupkin, PhD and Dr. Daniel Bos, MD, PhD


    Data science is a multi-disciplinary field that uses scientific methods and algorithms to extract knowledge and insights from structured and unstructured data. Recent advances in technology allows for the collection of enormous amounts of health-related data. Consequently, skills pertaining to handle and manipulate these data and to extract relevant information have become crucial to perform high quality research. Unfortunately, many researchers without a technical background frequently experience troubles obtaining or developing these skills. The aim of this course is to bridge this gap in knowledge by providing an interactive and hands-on programme about data science and how it can be applied in epidemiological research.


    Disciplines:

    • Data Science
    • Prediction
    • Epidemiology
    • Machine learning


    //Please note that the course information is subject to change and will be updated from time to time. We will do our utmost best to ensure the accuracy and reliability of the information on this website.//

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    25 May 2021 - 11 Jun 2021
    Introduction to Medical Writing [SC02]

    About this course

    During the second semester, full time Master of Science (70 ECTS) students will attend five workshops (three hours each) on how to write and correctly structure readable scientific articles in English.

    During the course participants will:

    • Compare different styles of scientific writing.
    • Turn clumsy and wordy writing into clear, understandable English.
    • Edit various parts of a badly written article.
    • Analyse the discussion section taken from a published article.
    • Write a title, abstract and introduction for a paper about their research.
    • Receive peer review of their writing from other participants and the trainer.

    On Day 4, participants will be offered 30-minute individual review sessions with the trainer. Participants can bring any writing they choose to the session.

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    29 Apr 2021 - 11 Jun 2021
    Networking & Influencing Skills [SC20]

    About this course

    How do you get things done in such a complex organization as the Erasmus MC? As in any big organization there are formal procedures and informal channels. In this one day course you will get a better view of your political arena and the players in your field. You will understand your own challenges and you will be invited to step out of your comfort zone to make the impact you deserve. Body language, tone, voice, tempo and bearing discomfort are needed to increase your visibility. At the end of the day you will know who to approach, and how, to make the first step in achieving your goal.

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    30 Aug 2021 - 17 Sept 2021
    Study Design [CK010]

    About this course

    In this course, the principles and practice of cohort and case-control studies will be taught as well as the important topics underlying epidemiologic studies such as validity and precision. The theory underlying the different design options and concepts will be discussed in depth using causal inference and counterfactuals. Also, a historical perspective on causal thinking will be presented. The course focuses on the classical approach but also addresses modern concepts. Lectures will be complemented by exercises using current examples of epidemiological studies.

    Participants will be asked to work out a study design and prepare a formal presentation in the last week of the course.

    For students in our master programmes, the core concepts presented in this course will be assessed in the core competences exam that bundles the fall semester courses. This is in addition to the assessment during the course in the form of a presentation. The core competences exam is only mandatory for students starting their programme in August 2021 or later, while the presentation during the course is mandatory for all participating students.

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    31 May 2021 - 02 Jun 2021
    Cardiovascular Epidemiology [EP20]

    About this course

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The overall objective of the cardiovascular epidemiology course is to produce epidemiologists and other health scientists with the essential knowledge to carry out high quality research in cardiovascular disease.

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    31 May 2021 - 04 Jun 2021
    Psychopharmacology [MP03]

    About this course

    Medical psychology is all about the interaction between mind and body: how do physical complaints affect our psychological functioning? But also: how does our psychological functioning affect us physically? When dealing with this interaction in a clinical setting, drug treatments often play an important role. Patients receiving drug treatment for psychiatric disorders frequently suffer physical side-effects, and drugs prescribed for somatic disorders can influence our mental state.

    Therefore, medical psychologists need to know which drugs are prescribed for common psychiatric and somatic disorders, and need to have a basic understanding of how these (psychoactive) drugs work, how and why they invariably lead to side-effects, and how these side-effect affect compliance. We will look at drug treatment for psychiatric disorders such as depression and schizophrenia, but also at drugs like corticosteroids – used in the treatment of somatic conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease – which have been found to increase the risk of suicidal behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders (i.e. depression, panic and manic episodes).

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